YDS: The Clare Spark Blog

October 21, 2010

Links to Pacifica memoirs

http://clarespark.com/2009/08/13/my-life-at-pacifica-radio-a-memoir-part-one/. (For an enlarged index see http://clarespark.com/2010/07/04/pacifica-radio-and-the-progressive-movement/.)

Lewis K. Hill

http://clarespark.com/2009/08/18/storming-pacifica-revising-my-view-of-pacifica-history-july-22-1999/

http://clarespark.com/2009/08/14/my-life-at-pacifica-part-two-with-gory-details-and-more-on-identity/.

http://clarespark.com/2010/07/04/pacifica-radio-and-the-progressive-movement/. (Has material on liberals and psychological warfare and mental health “testing.”)

Matthew Lasar, quoted in my memoir

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5 Comments »

  1. […] between Trotskyists, Stalinists, and the counter-culture.  (I have told much of this story here: http://clarespark.com/2010/10/21/links-to-pacifica-memoirs/.)  From what I was told, the local CP organized against me because I had allowed too many […]

    Pingback by Power, relationships, identity | YDS: The Clare Spark Blog — August 1, 2013 @ 5:08 pm | Reply

  2. [...] when program director at KPFK in Los Angeles. See my Pacifica memoirs, posted on the website (http://clarespark.com/2010/10/21/links-to-pacifica-memoirs/). Advertisement Eco World Content From Across The Internet. Featured on EcoPressed Get [...]

    Pingback by Turning points in the ascent/decline of the West « YDS: The Clare Spark Blog — October 24, 2011 @ 8:06 pm | Reply

  3. [...] sentiments. I wrote my own memoir (I was program director of Pacifica Radio in Los Angeles) here: http://clarespark.com/2010/10/21/links-to-pacifica-memoirs/. I left out most of the dirt, but what I included was bad enough.  I never thought I would see [...]

    Pingback by NPR vs. the money power « YDS: The Clare Spark Blog — March 9, 2011 @ 5:31 am | Reply

  4. I’m glad you posted these links. My first reading of “My Life at Pacifica, Part2” completely missed the allusion to Poe. Since then I’ve read his detective stories, and I can now appreciate it. I’d be interested to learn your take on the place of Poe in the ideological and political currents of his time(of which I confess near total ignorance).

    Comment by david gansel — October 22, 2010 @ 11:36 pm | Reply

    • Thanks David for recognizing C. Augusta Dupinstein’s origin in The Purloined Letter. Poe was a conservative whose strong reaction to the French Revolution should be more widely noted. He has a considerable following in France, but I found him inferior to Herman Melville (at the latter’s best). His work is packed with romantic necrophilia and misogyny, not to speak of the implicit antisemitism in The Man of the Crowd. Still, he must be read, for one thing, as a Southerner.

      Comment by clarespark — October 23, 2010 @ 12:09 am | Reply


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