YDS: The Clare Spark Blog

August 31, 2013

11 Comments »

  1. The Imperial German threat to Britain was not minor, although it certainly is arguable whether Britain could have avoided war in 1914. However, given the naval arms race (the Dreadnoughts) and the Kaiser’s desire to match or overmatch Britain at sea, added to Germany’s already existing preponderance in land forces — would Britain have had to fight anyway in the 1920s in a much worsened position, with fewer allies and Germany controlling the Belgian coast?

    Comment by Robert W Franson — September 3, 2014 @ 6:14 am | Reply

  2. The notion that the enemy is the Devil was originally a way to forestall war by designating a scapegoat, which doesn’t necessarily mean that the scapegoat was innocent. It was a way of managing violence with violence, and was pretty effective. But our world is now too complex for that mechanism to be of much use, and Hitler himself demonstrated how it could be used to cause a war and to justify genocidal extinctions. In that sense he is a good example of the ploy referred to as “Satan casting out Satan.” Naming this ploy was not, as many thought, an indictment of the Jews. Indeed it was the Jews who first discovered and demystified the mechanism and wrote a scripture that provides an alternative way of looking at the world… a more genuinely “objective” stance that takes into account the fact that humans, well… sin. The alternative to that understanding we have already seen. No need to repeat the lesson.

    By the way, in *Battling to the End*, which is an exegesis of Clausewitz, Rene Girard makes the suggestion that the French design to stop Hitler when he invaded the Rhineland (vetoed by the Americans and British) might well have stopped him cold. But that alone would not have addressed the underlying problem created by “citizen armies,” an innovation that Napoleon had introduced and that made escalation to the gravest extreme (or what Clausewitz called the “ideal war”) much more likely. The “ideal war” is a war that no one survives.

    Comment by Demosophist — April 6, 2014 @ 9:09 pm | Reply

    • I think it important to note that Jews have no concept of the Devil. Judaism is a worldly religion, but, unlike social engineers, finds human nature to be a mixed bag of positive and negative qualities. As individuals, we are expected to repent our bad actions and to make reparations to the victim, as an individual.

      Comment by clarelspark — April 6, 2014 @ 9:26 pm | Reply

  3. Taylor did view FDR as an isolationist.

    That would make sense. I seem to recall that in 1940 FDR campaigned on a platform to keep us out of the European war. There was no stomach among the people in the USA at that time to send their kids to die in another European bloodbath, as they did in WWI. Not our fight, was the feeling.

    Not related really, but I also seem to remember that McArthur repeatedly sent communications to the effect that he felt the Japanse were going to strike us, which was roundly dismissed as unrealistic.

    “the people” against malodorous “elites,” particularly the “moneybags” (Dutt’s term) whom everybody “hates.”

    Sounds just like Obama, or Liz (Fauxcahontas) Warren. Why am I not surprised? This, of course, after he gives a ‘heartfelt’ speech about inequality being the greatest challenge of our time, then flies of with his a family and an entourage of thousands to the toniest resorts of Hawaii for endless rounds of golf in tropical splendor, all on the taxpayers bill. Or Biden flying off to Paris and, instead of staying at the well appointed and secure embassy the taxpayers have provided, books entire floors of five star hotels, with limousines for all, managing to spend 1-1/2 million dollars (that $1,500,000 dollars) of tax money in a few days. How anyone believes a word that comes out of these people’s mouths I have no idea. There are Nomenklatura at the heads of these movements who intend to retain control and live like emperors while the hoi polloi live in chains and poverty. Always has been, always will be. Same old wine, new bottles.

    Constitutionally protected freedom, free markets (not crony capitalism), private property and limited government has provided the most freedom, the greatest technological and social advancement and the highest standard of living to the most people in history. But you’d never know it to watch the ‘news’ or attend university. Why is that? That, as they used to say, will be left as an exercise for the reader.

    Comment by Michael Hiteshew — January 8, 2014 @ 3:48 am | Reply

  4. The uncompromising terms set by Wilson Woodrow and humiliation of the German populations set the ground for nationalistic uprising and WWII

    Comment by Ivan Masarik — November 12, 2013 @ 12:54 am | Reply

    • That is the Lord Maynard Keynes view of things, but has been contradicted by Niall Ferguson and his supporters. In any case, the Great War and its awful resolution set the stage for WW2. That is why Ferguson asked if the Great War was even necessary, arguing that Germany did not pose the threat that British diplomats imagined.

      Comment by clarelspark — November 12, 2013 @ 1:04 am | Reply

    • That is the Lord Maynard Keynes view of things, but has been contradicted by Niall Ferguson and his supporters. In any case, the Great War and its awful resolution set the stage for WW2. That is why Ferguson asked if the Great War was even necessary, arguing that Germany did not pose the threat that British diplomats imagined.

      Comment by clarelspark — November 12, 2013 @ 1:04 am | Reply

  5. Great find on the 1942 war map. Clearly identifies the fears surrounding the “5th column” of Japanese and German immigrants ready to aid the old homelands.

    Comment by Scott G Lloyd — September 4, 2013 @ 9:54 pm | Reply

  6. […] European affairs as European countries fell into the lap of the Third Reich during the 1930s (see http://clarespark.com/2013/08/31/the-devil-in-history-a-j-p-taylor-vs-r-palme-dutt/ ),  were largely from the Midwest and South: many bought the defeatist line of such unapologetic […]

    Pingback by The Syria crisis and historicism | YDS: The Clare Spark Blog — September 4, 2013 @ 7:32 pm | Reply

  7. yikes!

    Comment by jeanee5TAM (@jeanee5TAM) — September 2, 2013 @ 12:52 am | Reply


RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

The Rubric Theme. Blog at WordPress.com.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,274 other followers

%d bloggers like this: